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Short-term happiness or long-term fulfillment?

We live in such an abundant world. We have access to pretty much anything and everything at the touch of our fingers. We have access to any type of food we want, any information you could possibly seek to find, we can connect with a friend on the other side of the world, we can get caught up in a virtual world of Mario Kart or Harry Potter, we literally can get a hit of dopamine as quick as we can have a thought. Think about it, Instagram literally feels like an instant gram. We unconsciously hop on and seek validation from others through a quick double-tap meanwhile comparing ourselves to what other people portray on their feed. It’s all instant happiness, but is it really happiness?

How sustainable are these means of seeking happiness in our lives? There is a big difference between happiness and fulfillment, or what I believe to be true happiness. Fulfillment, by definition, means to meet the requirement of a condition. We have been conditioned in our lives to believe that we need all of this excess that is readily available to us, but could you find happiness in simply getting your needs met? Could you be happy with a healthy body, a healthy mind, and a healthy family? We often forget that the most basic things in life are all that matter because once any of these things are taken from you, all of the other things that brought you “happiness” become irrelevant. 

I believe that if you can find gratitude wherever you are, you have found the key to a life of fulfillment. 

“Wherever you go, there you are.”

This simple quote is one of the most profound truths of life. A new car, some traveling destination, a big move, or even a new relationship will not bring you the happiness you are searching for. True happiness, or fulfillment, will only be found from the peace within your body. 

Happiness, joy, and fulfillment are readily available to you when you tap into the present moment.

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